Foreign Service Institute German Basic Course

Unit 4: Part 1


Im Konsulat

Basic Sentences [mp3 4.1]

I
the visit
the visa
the visitor's visa
a visitor's visa (subject or object)
to apply (for something)
he applies
Mr. Köhler wants to apply for a
visitor's visa for America.
old
the acquaintance
an old acquaintance (object)
In the consulate he meets an old acquaintance, Mr. Allen.
MR. KÖHLER
Hello, Mr. Allen.
that
I'm glad I ran into you ('Good that I just [happen to] meet you').
MR. ALLEN
Hello, Mr. Köhler.
there is, there are
is there, are there
that which is new
What's new with you? ('What is there that is new')
to hear
he hears
I hear you're planning to go to America.
to say, to tell
MR. KÖHLER
Yes; can you tell me where I can apply for a visa?
right
the colleague
my colleague (object)
MR. ALLEN
Of course: we can go right to my colleague Bill Jones.
the consul
the vice consul
a vice consul
the department, section
the visa section
He's a vice consul in the visa section.

I
der Besuch
das Visum
das Besuchsvisum
ein Besuchsvisum (nominative or accusative form)
beantragen
er beantragt
Herr Köhler will ein Besuchsvisum
nach Amerika beantragen.

alt
der Bekannte
einen alten Bekannten (acc. form)
Im Konsulat trifft er einen alten Bekannten, Herrn Allen.
HERR KÖHLER
Guten Tag, Herr Allen.
dass
Gut, dass ich Sie gerade treffe.

HERR ALLEN
Guten Tag, Herr Köhler.
es gibt
gibt's (- gibt es)
Neues
Was gibt's Neues?
hören
er hört
Ich höre, Sie wollen nach Amerika fahren.
sagen
HERR KÖHLER
Ja; können Sie mir sagen, wo ich ein Visum beantragen kann?
gleich mal
der Kollege
meinem Kollegen (dative form)
HERR ALLEN
Natürlich: wir können gleich mal zu meinem Kollegen Bill Jones gehen.
der Konsul
der Vizekonsul
Vizekonsul
die Abteilung
die Visa-Abteilung
Er ist Vizekonsul in der VisaAbteilung.
II
to introduce
he introduces
the gentlemen
Mr. Allen introduces the gentlemen (to each other.)
acquainted
to make acquainted, to
introduce
he introduces them (to each other)
MR. ALLEN
May I introduce you gentlemen?
Mr. Köhler - Mr. Jones.
for
to do
he does
MR. JONES
What can I do for you, Mr. Köhler?
MR. KÖHLER
I want to get a visa.
to emigrate
he emigrates
on a visit
MR. JONES
Are you planning to emigrate or go on a visit?
the business
the business trip
a business trip (subj or obj)
he takes a business trip
MR. KÖHLER
I'm going on business.
MR. JONES
How long do you intend to stay?
approximately, about
to, up to, until
the week
weeks
MR. KÖHLER
Approximately four to six weeks.
the German
(a) German
MR. JONES
You are German, aren't you?
the state, nation
the member (of a nation or family)
the national, the citizen
anational, a citizen
MR. KÖHLER
Yes, I'm a German citizen.
the identification card or paper
an identification card (obj)
MR. JONES
Do you have an identification card?
my passport (subject)
MR. KÖHLER
Here's my passport.
to fill out
he fills out
the form
the questionnaire
MR. JONES
Please fill out this form.
the application
your application (subject)
he, it will be
right away
processed
MR. JONES
Your application will then be processed right away.
MR. KÖHLER
Thank you very much.
II
vorstellen
er stellt ••• vor
die Herren (plural)
Herr Allen stellt die Herren vor.
bekannt
bekannt machen
er macht sie bekannt
HERR ALLEN
Darf ich die Herren bekannt machen?
Herr Köhler - Herr Jones.
für (preposition with acc)
tun
er tut
HERR JONES
Was kann ich für Sie tun, Herr Köhler?
HERR KÖHLER
Ich möchte ein Visum haben.
auswandern
er wandert ••• aus
auf Besuch
HERR JONES
Wollen Sie auswandern oder auf Besuch fahren?
das Geschäft
die Geschäftsreise
eine Geschäftsreise (nom or acc form)
er macht eine Geschäftsreise
HERR KÖHLER
Ich muss eine Geschäftsreise machen.
HERR JONES
Wie lange wollen Sie bleiben?
ungefähr
bis
die Woche
Wochen
HERR KÖHLER
Ungefähr vier bis sechs Wochen.
der Deutsche
Deutscher
HERR JONES
Sie sind Deutscher, nicht wahr?
der Staat
der Angehörige
der Staatsangehörigel
Staatsangehöriger
HERR KÖHLER
Ja, ich bin deutscher Staatsangehöriger.
der Ausweis
einen Ausweis (acc form)
HERR JONES
Haben Sie einen Ausweis?
mein Pass (nom form)
HERR KÖHLER
Hier ist mein Pass.
ausfüllen
er füllt ••• aus
das Formular
der Fragebogen
HERR JONES
Füllen Sie bitte dieses Formular aus.
der Antrag
Ihr Antrag (nom form)
er wird
gleich
bearbeitet
HERR JONES
Ihr Antrag wird dann gleich bearbeitet.
HERR KÖHLER
Vielen Dank.
III
MR. KÖHLER
Do you like it in Bremen, Mr. Allen?
I like being here, I'm glad
to be here
MR. ALLEN
Yes, I'm very glad to be here.
my wife (subj or obj)
the climate
to get used, to get
accustomed (to something)
he gets accustomed
Only my wife can't get used to the climate.
rather, more preferable
Bavaria
the san
our son (subject)
She'd rather live in Bavaria, and our san (would) too.
MR. KÖHLER
I can understand that.
the man from Bremen
a man from Bremen
MR. ALLEN
Aren't you (originally) from Bremen, Mr. Köhler?
the home
the home town, town where one grew up
my home town (subject or object)
MR. KÖHLER
No, my (original) home town is Berlin.
III
HERR KÖHLER
Gefällt es Ihnen in Bremen, Herr Allen?
ich bin gern hier
HERR ALLEN
Ja, ich bin sehr gern hier.
meine Frau (nom or acc form)
das Klima
sich gewöhnen (an etwas)
er gewöhnt sich
Meine Frau kann sich nur nicht an das Klima gewöhnen.
lieber
Bayern
der Sohn
unser Sohn (nom form)
Sie möchte lieber in Bayern wohnen und unser Sohn auch.
HERR KÖHLER
Das kann ich verstehen.
der Bremer
Bremer
HERR ALLEN
Sind Sie nicht Bremer, Herr Köhler?
die Heimat
die Heimatstadt
meine Heimatstadt (nom or acc form)
HERR KÖHLER
Nein, meine Heimatstadt ist Berlin.

IV
At the restaurant.
MR. KÖHLER
I like (to drink)
MR. ALLEN
I don't care for wine.
I'd lilte a glass of Pilsner and you?
I like (to drink) better
than
MR. KÖHLER
I prefer Würzburger to Pilsner.
I like (to drink) best
MR. ALLEN
I lilte Löwenbräu best. But unfortunately they don't have
it here.

IV
Im Restaurant.
HERR KÖHLER
Ich trinke gern.
HERR ALLEN
Wein trinke ich nicht gern.
Ich möchte ein Glas Pilsner, und Sie?

ich trinke lieber
als
HERR KÖHLER
Ich trinke lieber Würzburger als Pilsner.
ich trinke am liebsten
HERR ALLEN
Am liebsten trinke ich ja Löwenbräu. Aber das haben sie hier leider nicht.

V
the cigar store
a cigar store (subject or object)
MR. KÖHLER
Is there a cigar store near by?
the tobacco
no tobacco (object)
more
I don't have any tobacco left.
next door
one (referring to das-noun)
MR. ALLEN
There's one next door here.
the cigar
a cigar (subject or object)
MR. ALLEN
But I have some cigars.
to offer
he offers
May I offer you one?
MR. KÖHLER
NO, thank you.
to smoke
he smokes
the pipe
a pipe
I only smoke a pipe.
V
das Zigarrengeschäft
ein Zigarrengeschäft (nom or acc form)
HERR KÖHLER
Gibt es in der Nähe ein Zigarrengeschäft?
der Tabak
keinen Tabak (acc form)
mehr
Ich habe keinen Tabak mehr.
nebenan
eins
HERR ALLEN
Hier nebenan ist eins.
die Zigarre
eine Zigarre (nom or acc form)
HERR ALLEN
Aber ich habe Zigarren.
anbieten
er bietet ••• an
Darf ich Ihnen eine anbieten?
HERR KÖHLER
Nein, vielen Dank.
rauchen
er raucht
die Pfeife
Pfeife
Ich rauche nur Pfeife.
VI
the Sunday
next
(on) next Sunday
just
to us, to our house
MR. ALLEN
Why don't you come and see us next Sunday, Mr. Köhler? ('Just come to our house next Sunday, Mr. Köhler.')
the new building
a new building (object)
on the outskirts
of the town
We live in a new building on the outskirts of town now.
it suits me, it's convenient
for me
on Sunday
MR. KÖHLER
Sunday is not such a good day for me.
the engagement
an engagement (subject or object)
I already have an engagement.
too bad
the Saturday
the saturday
the Monday
the Tuesday
the Wednesday
the Thursday
the Friday
better
MR. ALLEN
That's too badr is Saturday any better for you? ('Is it any more convenient for you on Saturay?')
then
MR. KÖHLER
Yes, I'd be glad to come then.
shall we say, let us say
at 4 o'clock
it's all right with me
MR. ALLEN
Shall we say at four o'clock? Is that all right with you?
MR. KÖHLER
Fine.
our address (subject or
object)
MR. ALLEN
OUr address is 4 Schiller Street.
to greet
give my regards to
your wife, Mrs. (subject or object)
MR. KÖHLER
Please give my regards to Mrs. Allen.
remember me
to your wife, to Mrs. (obj)
MR. ALLEN
Thank you, I will. And please remember me to Mrs. Köhler, too. Til Saturday then. ('weIl then, until saturday')
VI
der Sonntag
nächsten
am nächsten Sonntag
mal
zu uns
HERR ALLEN
Kommen Sie doch mal am nächsten Sonntag zu uns, Herr Köhler.
der Neubau
einem Neubau (dative form)
am Rande
der Stadt
Wir wohnen jetzt in einem Neubau am Rande der Stadt.
es passt mir
am Sonntag
HERR KÖHLER
Am Sonntag passt es mir nicht gut.
die Verabredung
eine Verabredung (nom or acc form)
Ich habe schon eine Verabredung.
schade
der Sonnabend
der Samstag
der Montag
der Dienstag
der Mittwoch
der Donnerstag
der Freitag
besser
HERR ALLEN
Schade. Passt es Ihnen am Sonnabend besser?
da
HERR KÖHLER
Ja, da komme ich gern.
sagen wir
um vier Uhr
es ist mir recht
HERR ALLEN
Sagen wir um vier Uhr. Ist Ihnen das recht?
HERR KÖHLER
Ja.
unsere Adresse (nom or acc form)
HERR ALLEN
Unsere Adresse ist Schillerstrasse 4.
grüssen
grüssen Sie
Ihre Frau
Gemahlin (nom or acc form)
HERR KÖHLER
Grüssen Sie bitte Ihre Frau Gemahlin.
empfehlen Sie mich
Ihrer Frau Gemahlin (dative form)
HERR ALLEN
Danke, und empfehlen Sie mich bitte auch Ihrer Frau Gemahlin. Also dann bis Sonnabend.
VII
Let' s count:
twenty-one
twenty-two
twenty-three
twenty-four
twenty-five
twenty-six
twenty-seven
twenty-eight
twenty-nine
thirty
thirty-one
thirty-two
and so forth
forty
forty-one
etc.
fifty
How much is 20 and 30?
20 and 30 is 50.
How much is 18 and 25?
33 and 15?
17 and 19?
14 and 8 and 23?
31 and 16?
say these numbers: 37. 49. 28. 13. 22. 41, 24.
VII
Wir zählen:
einundzwanzig
zweiundzwanzig
dreiundzwanzig
vierundzwanzig
fünfundzwanzig
sechsundzwanzig
siebenundzwanzig
achtundzwanzig
neunundzwanzig
dreissig
einunddreissig
zweiunddreissig
und so weiter
vierzig
einundvierzig
usw.
fünfzig
Wieviel ist 20 und ~O?
20 und 30 ist 50.
Wieviel ist 18 und 25?
33 und 15?
17 und 19?
14 und 8 und 23?
31 und 16?
Sagen Sie diese Zahlen: 37. 49. 28. 13. 22. 41, 24.

 

*End of mp3 4.1*

Notes to the Basic Sentences

1. Many German nouns are formed as compounds of two or more other nouns. Sometimes the elements are just placed together and written as one word. Sometimes there is a special combining form of the noun which occurs in compounds. Very occasionally compound nouns are hyphenated in German. Note that in every case the specifier of the compound is the same as the specifier of its last element. i.e. Besuchsvisum is a das-word, just as Visum is a das-word. The following
compounds occur in this unit:

Besuchsvisum with the combining form Besuchs-
Visa-Abteilung with the combining form Visa-
Geschäftsreise with the combining form Geschäfts-
Staatsangehöriger with the combining form Staats-

2. The normal position of the verb in a subordinate clause in German is at the end of the clause.

3. Note that many German nouns which classify people according to profession, nationality, or membership in a group occur without a specifier.

4. Some German der-nouns end in -e if preceded by the specifier der but end in -er if preceded by no specifier or the specifier ein: der Deutsche, ein Deutscher, Deutscher (nominative forms); der Angehörige, ein Angehöriger, Angehöriger (nominative forms).

5. Samstag is more common in Western and Southern Germany. Sonnabend is more common in Northern and Eastern Germany.

6. Ihre Frau Gemahlin is polite, formal usage. A German says 'meine Frau' in referring to his own wife, but 'Ihre Frau Gemahlin' in referring to the wife of the person he is speaking to, unless he is very weIl acquainted with the family. In that case he would just say 'Ihre Frau'. A lady would normally say 'Ihre Frau' in talking to a man, unless the latter is a considerably older
person or one to whom she owes particular respect because of rank or position. In referring to her own husband she would just say 'mein Mann'.

Changes & Notes:

1. Angehörige seems to be pronounced with a Berlin dialect. In Berlin, Cologne, and parts of former East Germany G's can become J, so you'll hear something like: Ne jut jebratens Jans is ne jute Jabe Jottes. (Eine gut gebratens Gans ist eine gute Gabe Gottes.)

2. Sonnabend is the traditional northern form of the word for Saturday. Samstag is the standard form used everywhere else and used by most younger and educated speakers even in the north.

3. Grüssen is now spelled grüßen and dreissig is now spelled dreißig. Always use ß after ei, au, äu, and long vowels.

4. Empfehlen Sie mich and Frau Gemahlin are both very formal, and not commonly used.

[Thanks to kflavin84!]


Notes on Pronunciation [mp3 4.2]

A. The German ich-sound
Whisper English "yes". Prolong the initial sound, as if you were stuttering: yyyes". Whisper the name "Hugh" and prolong the initial sound in the sa':le way: "Hhhhugh". Feel the air friction alone. like a long drawn out, whispered hy- cornbination. Now try the German words with your instructor. If you have difficulty with them whisper English "yyyes" and "Hhhhugh" again for a moment and try to get the air friction sound here distinctly. The same kind of air friction will occur in all of the following German words:

Practice 1

ich
mich
weich
Pech
König
wenig
wichtig
endlich
Milch
welch
solch
durch
leicht
nicht
echt
recht


Practice 2

sicher
siechte
Küche
Tücher
Fächer
nächste
Löcher
höchste

weichen
gezeichnet
Seuche
leuchte
München
Häschen
Rippchen
Söckchen


B. The German ach-sound
There is no sound in English similar to German -ch in ach. Pronounce English "knock" and ask your instructor to pronounce German nach. Notice the difference in the final sounds of the two words. In the English word the back of the tongue is pressed against the back part of the roof of the mouth stopping the flow of air. If you don't stop the flow of air entirely but let some of it through by lowering the back part of your tongue just a little, you should approximate the German sound. This air friction, or spirant sound is not the same as the one described under A. It is a lower frequency sound. because it is produced farther
back in the mouth cavity. Practice until your instructor is satisfied with your pronunciation of the following words.

Practice 3

doch
auch
nach
Tuch
Bruch
Docht
taucht
macht
sucht
Sucht
kochen
fauchen
lachen
buchen
Tochter
hauchte
dachte
suchte
Buchten


Practice 4: the ich-sound and the ach-sound compared

Nacht
schwach
auch
fauchte
Nächte
schwäche
euch
feuchte
Loch
Tochter
Buch
Sucht
Löcher
Töchter
Bücher
süchtig

 

 

← Back to Contents or Go on to Part 2 →


Return to top of page ↑


© 1997 - 2014 Jennifer Wagner

ielanguages [at] gmail [dot] com

DisclaimerSite Map