Yvoire

I went to another “most beautiful village in France” this morning. Yvoire is on the southern shore of Lac Léman (Lake Geneva) and the city walls built in the 14th century still stand today. The weather was horrible and rainy, so my pictures aren’t as pretty as the ones on the official tourism site.

Sometimes I don’t fully appreciate these little places full of history (Yvoire turned 701 this year) because they’re so overrun with tourists and modern things. I had trouble imagining what life was like in that tiny medieval village hundreds of years ago. I thought the way the back of this house was built into the exterior wall of the city was cool though:


The reason I was in northern Haute-Savoie this morning was for David’s job. He had to do some interviews in Thonon-les-Bains and Sciez, but he knew they would be really short, so I went with him and read my new vocabulary books while he was working. Getting up at 7:15 am is hard when you haven’t had to in several months. Also, A LOT of Swiss people drive to France to dump their garbage. One of the interviews at a Tennis Club was located next to the déchetterie and more than half of the people driving in there were Swiss. (This is because Switzerland requires its citizens to pay for household garbage to be collected as an incentive to recycle more – which works since Switzerland is one of the top recyclers in the world. However, this also causes the cheap Swiss citizens to dump their garbage in neighboring countries…)

Désolée, je passe du coq à l’âne… I’m starting to freak out about not having my new carte de séjour yet, so we called the préfecture to see why it still has not arrived even though it was supposedly in Paris on June 26 – but the woman couldn’t tell us anything. And I couldn’t actually go there and talk to anyone since they’re closed to the public on Wednesday afternoons (of course!), so I’m storming in there at 8:30 AM tomorrow morning. I have a fear that the card has been lost and I’ll have to start all over again, or that the card has an October expiration date on it, and I’ll have to start all over again… Plus I’m worried how it will affect my application to exchange my driver’s license. I highly doubt they will accept a récépissé that expires in a week instead of the actual card. Or in the worst situation, they decide to not let me have a carte de séjour visiteur after all because they don’t understand/care about PACSing, which means I would be illegal here AND not be able to get a French driver’s license (at least not the cheap/easy way). I know I’m probably overreacting and jumping to conclusions… but still, I want to be prepared for the worst.

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  • Penny

    Good luck tomorrow at the Préfecture. I’ll stand on my balcony and send some good vibes over there :)

  • Penny

    Good luck tomorrow at the Préfecture. I’ll stand on my balcony and send some good vibes over there :)

  • Leah

    Good luck for demain, let us know how it goes!

  • Leah

    Good luck for demain, let us know how it goes!

  • DestinationMetz

    good luck, try not to worry, but it is good to be prepared for the worst. makes it all the more good when things actually run smoothly.

  • DestinationMetz

    good luck, try not to worry, but it is good to be prepared for the worst. makes it all the more good when things actually run smoothly.

  • Linda

    There’s an easy way to get a driver’s license. Do tell. I so don’t want to take that stupid, expensive class. So far, I’m still using my American driver’s license and saying that I only live here 6 months a year.

  • Linda

    There’s an easy way to get a driver’s license. Do tell. I so don’t want to take that stupid, expensive class. So far, I’m still using my American driver’s license and saying that I only live here 6 months a year.

Why is Jennie no longer in France?

I created this blog in September 2006 when I moved to France from Michigan to teach English. Many of the earlier posts are about my personal life in France, dealing with culture shock, traveling in Europe and becoming fluent in French. In July 2011, I relocated to Australia to start my PhD in Applied Linguistics. Although I am no longer living in France, my research is on foreign language pedagogy and I teach French at a university so these themes appear most often on the blog. I also continue to post about traveling and being an American abroad.

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