Category Archives: Teaching Assistantship

Teaching Assistant Program in France

Teaching Assistant Program in France (TAPIF) Application Now Available

Apply to the Teaching Assistant Program in France

US or Canadian citizens who want to teach English in the French public school system as an official teaching assistant, the application for the 2016-17 school year is now available at tapif.org. Official information about the Teaching Assistant Program in France, or TAPIF, as well as eligibility requirements can be found at the American or the Canadian sites. You can also read my TAPIF Guide and download free ESL lesson plans that I used to teach English in France.

The only change from previous years is that the age limit is now 20-35 instead of 20-30. The US program requires three years of university to have been completed before October 2016 while the Canadian program requires only two. The deadline for US citizens has been extended to January 31, 2016, while it is February 15, 2016, for Canadian citizens. Permanent residents are also eligible to apply as long as the majority of their secondary and university education took place in the US or Canada in English.

This program does exist for other English-speaking nationalities, but with different application procedures and deadlines. Some programs have not yet made their applications available, but Australia’s deadline is December 14, 2015, while New Zealand’s is December 7, 2015. Applications for the UK program are due January 17, 2016. I will update this post with links to other countries once their applications are available.

If you do not qualify for the teaching assistantship program but would like to teach English in France, there are also lecteur d’anglais or lectrice d’anglais positions available at universities for those who have completed at least one year of a Master’s degree. Any listings of open positions for 2016-17 are available here.

English Teaching Assistant in France & Overseas Departments 2015-2016

If you would like to teach English in the public school system in France as an assistant for the 2015-2016 school year (October 1, 2015 to April 30, 2016), use the links below to find out the specific requirements and application process for your country.

In general, you must be a native English speaker, have finished two to three years of university & be between 20 and 30 years old by October 1, 2015, and speak French at an intermediate (B1) level. The teaching assistantship program in France is open to citizens of other countries as well, to teach German, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Arabic, Chinese, Russian, etc. in French public schools. Refer to the official CIEP website for all countries and languages involved in the program.

Assistants work 12 hours a week and are paid about 795€ a month net, with paid vacations in October, December, February, and April. There is only one contract length (7 months) but you can still choose between two levels: primary (elementary school) or secondary (middle school, high school, or both). For the majority of countries, assistants can be assigned to mainland France + Corsica and the overseas départements of Martinique, Guadeloupe, French Guiana and La Réunion. Assistants working in the overseas départements have a slightly higher salary to compensate for the higher cost of living; however, assistants working in Paris or other cities with high costs of living in mainland France do NOT have a higher salary. Australia and New Zealand also send assistants to New Caledonia, but the school year is between March and October so the application process is different.

You can read through my Guide for English Language Assistants in France for more detailed information and my personal experience as an assistant in 2006-2008, as well as download all of the ESL lesson plans I created for my classes.

Applications for many countries are now available, and the deadlines range from December to March. You should be notified between April and June if you have been accepted. Most countries require you to go to the French embassy/consulate to get your visa before leaving for France, so make sure you take that into account because it could be very far from where you live and you will have to pay for your own transportation. All Australians must go to Sydney and all NZers must go to Wellington, for example. The visa is free, however. Assistants are responsible for buying their own plane tickets to France and finding their own housing (though some schools may be able to help with this.) Non-EU citizens are also required to undergo a medical visit upon arrival in France. Since assistants have low incomes, they are eligible to receive money from the state (CAF) to help pay rent, though the amount depends on age, current rent, previous income, etc. Assistants can give private English lessons and baby-sit to earn extra cash.

France

Links to each country’s French embassy page:

Deadline is January 15, 2015, (deadline extended to January 29) and there is an application fee of $40 USD. Dual French-American citizens are not eligible to apply; however, all other dual EU-American citizens may apply. Applicants must have completed three years of higher education by October 1, 2015. Check out the TAPIF USA page on Facebook if you have questions that are not answered on the French Culture site linked above.

Deadline is March 1, 2015, and there is an application fee of $40 USD. Dual French-Canadian citizens are not eligible to apply; however, all other dual EU-Canadian citizens may apply. Applicants must have completed two years of higher education by October 1, 2015.

Deadline is December 19, 2014.

Deadline: February 20, 2015.

Deadline: December 17, 2014. There are also positions in New Caledonia, but the deadline for teaching March-October 2015 has already passed. Application deadline for New Caledonia is usually in September.

Deadline: February 27, 2015. There are also positions in New Caledonia and Wallis et Futuna, but the deadline for teaching March-October 2015 has already passed. Application deadline for New Caledonia is usually in September and Wallis et Futuna in October.

Deadline: December 2, 2014.

Deadline: January 5, 2015. Also note: “The program is also open to students from the University of the West Indies from Anguilla, Antigua and Barbuda, British Virgin Islands, Dominica, Grenada, Montserrat, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines.”

Citizens of South Africa, Trinidad & Tobago, and Barbados are also eligible, but I could not find any pages on the assistantship program on the embassy websites. The official CIEP site has applications for these countries, but the deadline dates are not specified.

If you do not qualify for the teaching assistantship program but would like to teach English in France, there are also lecteur d’anglais or lectrice d’anglais positions available at universities for those who have more than a Bachelor’s degree. I will post any open positions for 2015-2016 on this blog as I find them. You can also look at the positions for 2014-2015 to get an idea of what was available last year and the typical deadlines.

Foreign Income on US Taxes plus Foreign Bank Account and Affordable Care Act Filing Requirements

Foreign Earned Income Exclusion for Americans Living Abroad

Updated with figures for 2015 tax returns and forms for the Affordable Care Act. Spoiler Alert: Having foreign income may increase your overall tax amount AND your monthly premiums for health insurance in the US.

Reminder for Americans with foreign income: Declare all foreign income on US income tax returns!

For most English teaching assistants in France, for example, this often simply means including the assistant income on line 21 of Form 1040 as “other income.” This will increase the adjusted gross income, however, and if it is more than $10,300 (if you are single and under 65), you must file tax returns and you might have to pay taxes – unless you have other deductions besides the standard of $6,300 (if you are single) or other exemptions besides the standard of $4,000 (if you have no dependents). Even if your adjusted gross income is less than $10,300, your taxable income is 0 and you are not required to file, it is still a good idea to do so to reduce your risk of audit in the future.

Paid Income Tax in Another Country?

If you paid income taxes in another country, you might be able to use the Foreign Tax Credit (Form 1116). You can either claim a credit for eligible foreign taxes or deduct foreign income taxes as an Itemized Deduction on Schedule A. But if your deductions on Schedule A are less than the standardized deduction, you should choose the standardized deduction instead.

Did Not Pay Taxes on Foreign Income?

If you did not pay taxes on your foreign income, such as English teaching assistants who do not make enough to be taxed in France or students who received a tax-free scholarship to study in another country, you may be able to use the Foreign Earned Income Exclusion (Form 2555) if you made less than $100,800 in 2015. (Teaching assistants, stop laughing/crying!) However, in order to claim this exclusion, you must be outside of the United States for at least 330 days of a twelve month period that includes part of 2015. This means that most assistants do not qualify, unless they managed to remain outside of the US for more than 35 days over a 365 day period.

Foreign Income Exclusion for Americans Living Abroad Photo Credit: John-Morgan via Compfight cc

How to Fill Out Form 2555

If you are able to claim the Foreign Earned Income Exclusion, Form 2555 is quite simple to fill out. This form doesn’t explicitly tell you to put your foreign income on line 7 of Form 1040 though, so just add it to other wages, salaries, etc. if you need to.  You will then subtract it out on line 21 where you put the same amount in parentheses and write Form 2555 on the line to the left. When claiming the exclusion, your foreign income does NOT increase your adjusted gross income, but it WILL increase the amount of tax you need to report on line 44 of Form 1040 (if your taxable income is more than 0). Your taxable income is often your adjusted gross income minus $10,300 ($6,300 for the standard deduction on line 40 and $4,000 for the exemption on line 42) if you are single with no dependents.

If you read the instructions for Form 1040, the very last paragraph for line 44 states: “If you claimed the foreign earned income exclusion, housing exclusion, or housing deduction on Form 2555 or 2555-EZ, you must figure your tax using the Foreign Earned Income Tax Worksheet.” The worksheet is on the next page and it basically instructs you to figure out the tax rate of your taxable income (line 43 on Form 1040) PLUS your foreign income (from Form 2555) and then subtract out the tax rate for your foreign income alone. Essentially this pushes your taxable income into a higher tax bracket as it will be higher than if you just look up the tax rate for your taxable income alone. If you also have qualified dividends, then you must use the Qualified Dividends and Capital Gain Tax Worksheet in order to figure out the correct number to put on line 4 of the Foreign Income Tax Worksheet. So simple, right?

If you only have foreign income and you are able to deduct all of it, then your taxable income will be 0 so you don’t need to worry about using the Foreign Earned Income Tax Worksheet or paying taxes.

However, if you have both US and foreign income (such as self-employed Americans – like bloggers with ad revenue – who also work at a different job abroad), you will end up paying more in taxes than if you had only foreign income. Let’s say you have $5,000 for your taxable (NOT adjusted gross) income on line 43 of Form 1040 and $10,000 for your foreign income. You would put 10,000 on line 7 of Form 1040 and (10,000) on line 21. But when you get to line 44, you’ll have to use the Foreign Earned Income Tax Worksheet found in the 1040 instructions. Assuming you are single and do not have qualified dividends, this is how the worksheet would look:

1. Taxable income from Form 1040, line 43 = 5,000

2. Foreign income from Form 2555, line 50= 10,000

3. Add lines 1 and 2 = 15,000

4. Tax on amount of line 3 = 1,793 [look up 15,000 in tax table in 1040 instructions]

5. Tax on amount of line 2 = 1,043 [look up 10,000 in tax table]

6. Subtract line 5 from line 4; include this amount on Form 1040, line 44 = 750

So you would have to put $750 for the amount of your tax. If you did not read the instructions and did not use the Foreign Earned Income Tax Worksheet, you would have simply looked up the tax rate for your taxable income of $5,000, which is $503. But thanks to your foreign income, you must instead pay $750. Even though you can exclude your foreign income from your adjusted gross income, you may still end up paying more taxes. Isn’t being an American expat great?

 

Affordable Care Act Filing Requirements

Americans living abroad who do file tax returns, make sure to include Form 8965 Health Coverage Exemptions to show that you are not required to have health care in the US since you do not live in the country. Just use the letter C as the Exemption Type and check the Full Year box in Part III.

If you moved back to the US during 2015, you will need both forms 8965 AND 8962 if you received advanced premium tax credits to lower your monthly premium instead of paying the entire premium upfront (or if you didn’t get healthcare coverage at all and will need to pay the penalty – but remember there is also an exemption for a gap in coverage up to 3 months, listed as Exemption Type B). On Form 8962, you will need to answer No to Question 10 in Part II and figure out the monthly premium tax credit since you did not have coverage for the entire year in the US.

For example, I only had coverage in the US from October to December 2015 since I moved back to the US in August. I used Exemption Type C (living outside US) for January to July, and Exemption Type B (short gap in coverage) for August and September on form 8965. Then on form 8962, I only filled out the premium payment information for October to December and left the other months blank.

Yet another way that Americans with foreign income get screwed over is that foreign income is taken into consideration for the calculation of the Premium Tax Credit if you used the Foreign Earned Income Exclusion Form 2555. This essentially means that you have to pay more for health insurance during the year that you moved back to the US. When you register at healthcare.gov, you are requested to give your adjusted gross income so they can calculate the amount of your premium tax credit. However, form 8962 asks for your modified adjusted gross income (which is your adjusted gross income PLUS your foreign income). So unless you want to pay more taxes rather than having a higher monthly premium, give your modified AGI, or your best estimate of it, when signing up through healthcare.gov.

 

Foreign Bank Account Filing Requirements

For anyone with a foreign bank account – whether you live(d) abroad or not – you will also need to check Yes on line 7A of Schedule B, and you will need to include the amount of interest earned on all domestic and foreign bank accounts on line 1. If at any point during the year, the amount of your foreign bank account was $10,000 USD or more, you must also submit the FBAR form online at the BSA E-Filing System. Unlike income tax which is due by April 15, you have until June 30 to submit this form – however, Schedule B should still be submitted with your 1040 by April 15.

 

(Trying to) File Online

Be wary of the Free File websites as many do not report foreign income correctly (and you can’t use the majority of them anyway if you no longer live in the US). I tried some of them and a few didn’t even include foreign income on the 1040 while others only included the amount in parentheses on line 21 so the adjusted gross income was a negative number.  I was also unsuccessful in submitting the forms electronically – even simply using Free Fillable Forms – when I was living abroad and could not put an end date under the Bona Fide Residence part, which created errors and a rejection of the file. The instructions say to write “continues” but that didn’t work for me either. So you may end up needing to mail the paper forms to Texas (if you’re not including payment) or North Carolina (if you are including payment).

Disclaimer: I am not an accountant or tax specialist so if you have questions about your return, contact the IRS.

North American Language and Culture Assistants in Spain

If you are a US or Canadian citizen who would like to teach English at public schools in Spain, the North American Language and Culture Assistants program is accepting applications until April 1, 2014. Canadian applicants whose first language is French can also apply to teach French instead of English. This program is similar to the Teaching Assistant Program in France, though there are a few differences.

Cultural ambassadors in Spain

The requirements to apply are:

  • Be a US or Canadian national
  • Hold a minimum of a BA or BS by the end of the academic year preceding the start of the program, be a junior or a senior, or have become a university graduate. (Your major can be in any subject as long as you have basic communicative skills in Spanish and you do not need to submit tests scores to prove your level in Spanish.)
  • Have English or French as the first language
  • Be in good physical and psychological condition. It will be necessary to submit a complete medical evaluation signed by your doctor when it is time to apply for your visa.
  • Have a clean background check. You will need to submit a background check when it is time to apply for your visa.

There is no age limit for this program, except in Madrid where the age limit is 35. Language assistants work 12 to 16 hours a week at elementary, secondary or language schools between October 1 and May 31. The monthly stipend is 700€ if placed outside of Madrid and 1,000€ if placed in Madrid. Renewing for another year is possible.

Not all regions of Spain participate in this program. You cannot choose the regions of Cataluña or Valencia, the Canary Islands, or the Spanish cities of Ceuta and Melilla on the northern coast of Africa. If you had your heart set on Barcelona, sorry! Also keep in mind that some autonomous regions, such as the Balearic Islands, Galicia, Navarra, and País Vasco have two official languages so you may not actually use Spanish as much in these areas. If you are placed in these regions, it would be worthwhile to start learning Catalan, Galician or Basque.

There is no application fee and the deadline is April 1, 2014.

North American Language and Culture Assistants in Spain

English Teaching Assistant in France 2014-2015

If you would like to teach English in the public school system in France as an assistant for the 2014-2015 school year (October 1, 2014 to April 30, 2015), use the links below to find out the specific requirements and application process for your country. In general, you must be a native English speaker, have finished two to three years of university & be between 20 and 30 years old by October 1, 2014, and speak French at an intermediate (B1) level. The teaching assistantship program in France is open to citizens of other countries as well, to teach German, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Arabic, Chinese, Russian, etc. in French public schools. Refer to the official CIEP website for all countries and languages involved in the program.

Assistants work 12 hours a week and are paid about 795€ a month net, with paid vacations in October, December, February, and April. There is only one contract length (7 months) but you can still choose between two levels: primary (elementary school) or secondary (middle school, high school, or both). For the majority of countries, assistants can be assigned to mainland France + Corsica and the overseas départements of Martinique, Guadeloupe, French Guyana and La Réunion. Assistants working in the overseas départements have a slightly higher salary to compensate for the higher cost of living; however, assistants working in Paris or other cities with high costs of living in mainland France do NOT have a higher salary. Australia and New Zealand also send assistants to New Caledonia, but the school year is between March and October so the application process is different.

You can read through my Guide for English Language Assistants in France for more detailed information and my personal experience as an assistant, as well as download all of the ESL lesson plans I created for my classes.

Applications for many Anglophone countries are now available, and the deadlines range from December to March. You should be notified between April and June if you have been accepted.  Most countries require you to go to the French embassy/consulate to get your visa before leaving for France, so make sure you take that into account because it could be very far from where you live and you will have to pay for your own transportation. All Australians must go to Sydney and all NZers must go to Wellington, for example. The visa is free, however. Assistants are responsible for buying their own plane tickets to France and finding their own housing (though some schools may be able to help with this.) Non-EU citizens are also required to undergo a medical visit upon arrival in France. Since assistants have low incomes, they are eligible to receive money from the state (CAF) to help pay rent, though the amount depends on age, current rent, previous income, etc. Assistants are allowed to have a second job as long as they get permission from their school and it does not pay more than 30% of the assistant salary.

France

Links to each country’s French embassy page:

Deadline is January 15, 2014, and there is an application fee of $40. Dual French-American citizens are not eligible to apply; however, all other dual EU-American citizens may apply. Also check out the TAPIF USA page on Facebook if you have questions that are not answered on the French Culture site linked above.

Deadline is March 1, 2014. Canadians must be enrolled in university at the time of application.

Deadline is January 31, 2014.

Deadline is February 3, 2014.

Deadline is December 13, 2013. There are also positions in New Caledonia, but the deadline for teaching March-October 2014 has already passed. Application deadline for New Caledonia is usually in September.

Deadline is March 21, 2014. There are also positions in New Caledonia, but the deadline for teaching March-October 2014 has already passed. Application deadline for New Caledonia is usually in August.

Deadline is December 2, 2013.

Deadline is January 3, 2014. Also note: “This year, the program is also open to students from the University of the West Indies from Anguilla, Antigua and Barbuda, British Virgin Islands, Dominica, Grenada, Montserrat, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines.

Citizens of South AfricaTrinidad & Tobago, and Barbados are also eligible, but I could not find any pages on the assistantship program on the embassy websites. The official CIEP site has applications for these countries, but the deadline dates are not specified.

English Teaching Opportunities in France, Spain and Germany for 2013

Update: If you’re looking for jobs in France for the 2014-15 school year, go here.

 

If you’re interested in teaching English in Europe later this year, here are a few jobs:

 

FRANCE

Added June 12:

English lecteur/lectrice positions at Université Paris Dauphine to begin September 1, 2013.

Requirements:

  • English must be your mother tongue or a language that you speak with the same proficiency as your mother tongue
  • You must have successfully completed one year of university studies after receiving your Bachelor’s degree.

Candidates should include the following in their application file:

  • Résumé
  • Photocopy of your university diploma and a French translation of the document
  • Letter of Motivation
  • Photocopy of a photo I.D.

All applications must be submitted via email to the following address: recrutement.lecteurs@dauphine.fr

Application deadline: June 27th 2013

 

Now closed or no deadline was given (but you can always send your CV anyway):

Added May 11:

Maître de langues in English at Université de Lorraine in Nancy, France, to begin in September 2013. Native speaker of English and Master’s degree required. Send lettre de motivation and CV to andre dot pannier at univ-lorraine dot fr before May 31.

Added April 30:

Lecteur/lectrice in English at Université d’Evry, south of Paris, France, to begin in September 2013.  Teaching experience of English important, especially at secondary school/university level;  a Master’s (or at least a first year of Master’s) is required;  nationality of a European Union country is required, or if anglophone from outside Europe, residence/work papers must already be established; contract = 200 hours per year – extra hours possible. Please contact Frederick Goodman, by 21st May at the latest, at goodman at univ-evry dot fr

Added April 7:

Lecteur d’anglais at Université de technologie de Belfort-Montbéliard in Belfort, France, to begin in September 2013. Applicant should be a native speaker or have near-native fluency as well as  an MA or equivalent degree. For more information about this position, contact Laurent dot Tourrette at utbm dot fr To apply, send CV and lettre de motivation to bettina dot steffen at utbm dot fr by April 26.

Added April 4:

English Lecturer position in Hypermedia Language Centre of the Faculté de langues appliqués, commerce et communication at Université Blaise Pascal, in Clermont-Ferrand, France, to begin in September 2013. Applicant should be a university graduate and native speaker of English with training/experience in TEFL. Certification such as CELTA is a plus. CV, references and covering letter should be sent by email to Dacia Dressen-Hammouda at Dacia dot Hammouda at univ-bpclermont dot fr (no application deadline was given)

Added March 27:

Lecteur d’anglais in the Centre de Langues Vivantes at Université Pierre Mendès-France in Grenoble, France, to begin September 2013. Applicant should have minimum Bac+4. Send lettre de motivation, CV, copy of ID card/passport and diplomas by April 19.

Added March 23:

Lecteur d’anglais at Chimie ParisTech in Paris, France, to begin in September 2013. Applicant should be a native speaker with an MA or a BA. Send CV and lettre de motivation in French to jean-le-bousse at chimie-paristech dot fr by April 30. (2 positions available.)

Added March 20:

Maître de langue in the UFR de Sciences et Technologie at U-PEC in Paris, France, to begin in September 2013. Applicant should be in or have completed at least one year of a doctoral program. Send lettre de motivation in French and CV in English to Monsieur Bernard Frouin [frouin at u-pec dot fr] and Madame Andrée Martin [a.martin at u-pec dot fr] (no application deadline was given)

Maître de langue at IEP in Lille, France, to begin in September 2013. Applicant should be in or have completed at least one year of a doctoral program. Apply between March 4 and 29.

ens

 

Lecteur/Lectrice at ENS in Lyon, France, to begin in September 2013. Applicant should have completed four full years of university study, or equivalent to completion of one year of Master’s degree in France. Applications due by March 25.

For more info about these types of positions at French universities, read my post on How to Become a Lecteur or Maître de Langue.

 

GERMANY

English teacher for 4 week summer programs (July/August) at Sommerschule in Wust, Germany. MA not required, but some German is. Program usually pays for airfare, housing and offers a small stipend. Apply through their website starting in May of each year.

 

NO LONGER OPEN FOR APPLICATIONS:

For those who do not yet have graduate degrees and are under 30, the teaching assistant program is still open for some nationalities (for October 2013 to April 2014). You can read about my experience in France at my Guide for English Language Assistants in France. Applications for the USUK and Indian programs are no longer open for 2013 but the applications for 2014 will be available in October. If you have citizenship in other countries, you still have time to apply:

 

SPAIN

If you’re American or Canadian (under 35) and speak some Spanish instead of French, you can apply for the Spanish teaching assistantship. The deadline for applications is April 2.

 

I’ll continue to update this page if I find any other job listings for 2013.

 

Teaching Assistant Program in France for 2012-2013 School Year

If you would like to teach English in the public school system in France or the DOM-TOMs as an assistant for the 2012-2013 school year (October 1, 2012 to April 30, 2013), use the links below to find out the specific requirements and application process for your country. In general, you must be a native English speaker, have finished two years of university & be less than 30 years old by October 1, 2012, and speak French at an intermediate (B1) level. The teaching assistantship program in France is open to citizens of other countries as well, to teach German, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Arabic, Chinese, Russian, etc. in French public schools. Refer to the official CIEP website for all countries and languages involved in the program.

Assistants work 12 hours a week and are paid about 780€ a month net, with paid vacations in October, December, February, and April. As of this year, there is only one contract length (7 months) but you can still choose between two levels: primary (elementary school) or secondary (middle school, high school, or both). For the majority of countries, assistants can be assigned to mainland France + Corsica and the overseas départements of Martinique, Guadeloupe, French Guiana and La Réunion. Assistants working in the overseas départements have a slightly higher salary to compensate for the higher cost of living; however, assistants working in Paris or other cities with high costs of living in mainland France do NOT have a higher salary. Australia and New Zealand also send assistants to New Caledonia, but the school year is between March and October so the application process is different.

You can read through my Guide for English Language Assistants in France for more detailed information and my personal experience as an assistant, as well as download all of the ESL lesson plans I created for my classes. If you have questions about the program, search the Assistants in France forums where many past assistants such as myself (I’m the moderator) help out the new and hopeful assistants.

All applications for Anglophone countries are now available, and the deadlines range from December to March. You should be notified between April and June if you have been accepted.  Most countries require you to go to the French embassy/consulate to get your visa before leaving for France, so make sure you take that into account because it could be very far from where you live and you will have to pay for your own transportation. All Australians must go to Sydney and all NZers must go to Wellington, for example. The visa is free, however. Assistants are responsible for buying their own plane tickets to France and finding their own housing (though some schools may be able to help with this.) Non-EU citizens are also required to undergo a medical visit upon arrival in France. Since assistants have low incomes, they are eligible to receive money from the state (CAF) to help pay rent, though the amount depends on age, current rent, previous income, etc. Assistants are allowed to have a second job as long as they get permission from their school and it does not pay more than 30% of the assistant salary.

France

Links to each country’s French embassy page on the assistant program and the approximate number of positions available:

  • USA : 1,450 (last year 2,100 people applied)

Deadline is January 15, 2012, and there is an application fee of $40. Dual French-American citizens are no longer allowed to apply; however, all other dual EU-American citizens may apply. Also check out the TAPIF USA page on Facebook if you have questions that are not answered on the French Culture site linked above.

Deadline is March 1, 2012. Canadians must be enrolled in university at the time of application.

Deadline is December 1, 2011.

Deadline is March 2, 2012.

Deadline is December 12, 2011. There are also 4 positions in New Caledonia, but the deadline for teaching March-October 2012 has already passed. Application deadline for New Caledonia is usually in September.

Application is available now. Deadline is March 12, 2012. There are also positions in New Caledonia, but the deadline for teaching March-October 2012 has already passed. Application deadline for New Caledonia is usually in August.

Deadline is December 15, 2011.

Deadline is beginning of January 2012.

Citizens of South AfricaTrinidad & Tobago, and Barbados are also eligible, but I could not find any pages on the assistantship program on the embassy websites. The official CIEP site has applications for these countries, but the deadline dates are not specified.

English Language Teaching Assistantship in France for 2011-2012 School Year

If you would like to teach English in the public school system in France or the DOM-TOMs as an assistant for the 2011-2012 school year (October 1, 2011 to either April 30, 2012 or June 30, 2012) , use the links below to find out the specific requirements and application process for your country. In general, you must be a native English speaker, have finished two years of university & be less than 30 years old by October 1, 2011, and speak French at an intermediate level.

Assistants work 12 hours a week and are paid 780€ a month (after social security is taken out), with paid vacations in October, December, February, and April. There are two contract lengths (7 or 9 months) and two levels (primary or secondary – though only the primary level has 9 month positions.) For the majority of countries, assistants can be assigned to mainland France + Corsica and the overseas départements of Martinique, Guadeloupe, Guyane and La Réunion. Assistants working in Corsica and the overseas départements have a slightly higher salary to compensate for the higher cost of living. Australia and New Zealand also send assistants to New Caledonia, but the school year is between March 15 and October 15 so the application process is different.

You can read through my Guide for English Language Assistants in France for more detailed information and my personal experience as an assistant, as well as download all of the ESL lesson plans I created for my classes. If you have questions about the program, search the Assistants in France forums where many past assistants such as myself (I’m the moderator) help out the new and hopeful assistants.

Most applications become available in October, and the deadlines range from December to March. You should be notified between April and June if you have been accepted.  Most countries require you to go to the French embassy/consulate to get your visa before leaving for France, so make sure you take that into account because it could be very far from where you live. All Australians must go to Sydney and all NZers must go to Wellington, for example.

France

Links to each country’s French embassy page on the assistant program and the approximate number of positions available:

  • USA : 1,500 (last year 2,300 people applied*)

Application available as of October 11. Deadline is January 1, 2011. As of this year, dual French-American citizens are no longer allowed to apply.

Application will be available soon. Deadline is March 1, 2011.

Application will be available soon.

Application will be available soon. Deadline will be around March 24, 2011.

Application available now. Deadline is December 11, 2010.

Application available now. Deadline is January 22, 2011.

Application available now. Deadline is December 15, 2010.

Application available now. Deadline is January 11, 2011.

Citizens of South AfricaTrinidad & Tobago, and Barbados are also eligible, but I could not find any pages on the assistantship program on the embassy websites. The official CIEP site has applications for these countries, but the deadline dates are not specified.

*Acceptance criteria from the Teaching Assistant Program in France – USA Facebook page:

“Last year we had around 2,300 applications for approximately 1,500 spots. We evaluate applications based on a number of criteria (including French-language skills, experience teaching or working with children or young adults, experience living abroad, level of university studies, etc.) and then rank the applications. The top 1,500 applicants are offered positions in early April. Those applicants who do not make the top 1,500, but still meet the program’s basic eligibility requirements, are placed on a waiting list for spots that open up over the course of the summer due to withdrawals.”

Free English as a Second Language (ESL) Lesson Plans and Activities

This weekend was the end of les grandes vacances in France because all public school students start the school year on Thursday. I actually love this time year of because it means that France is alive again. It’s not just back to school, but back to work since a lot of stores and businesses close in July and August when most people leave on vacation. I’m looking forward to getting back to regular life this fall even though that means unemployment for me once again.

Even though I don’t exactly have a rentrée of my own this year, I figured it was time to update the ESL Lesson Plans page for those who will be teaching English this fall. Most of the lessons I used as a lectrice were designed as interactive exercises for students to do while using a computer in class. I’ve reformatted some of them so that they can be printed and copied more easily, and will continue to add more lessons as I finally clean out the English folders on my hard drives. My first two years as an assistant I spent a ridiculous amount of time on planning lessons and therefore thinking in English, when I should have been  improving my French everyday. I hope these resources will help future assistants take advantage of their short time in France.

My lectrice job at the university was a 12 month short-term contract, renewable for only one extra year. So as of October 1, I will be unemployed because even though there are vacataire jobs at the university that have been offered to me, you must already have a job in order to be hired, because vacataires are only paid every 6 months. (Yes, sometimes you must have a job in order to get a job in France.) My only option now is to wait to see if there are any open English assistant positions at high schools in the area, but I have to wait until the original assistant assigned to the school has resigned or just doesn’t show up by October 15.

Luckily I still have one more month of paid vacation so I have some time to figure things out. Teaching English is really the only job I can get in France since I’m not an EU citizen and don’t have a degree earned from a French university. In all honesty, I would much rather teach French than English, but that’s not going to happen in France. I’ll probably start a French as a Second Language page so I can upload lessons and materials for French teachers to use, and I’ll work on creating more audio flashcards and exercises to go along with the tutorials.

For more information on the English assistant program in the French public school system, read the Guide for English Language Assistants in France. If you’re interested in working at a university in France, then check out How to Become a Lecteur/Lectrice d’Anglais or Maître de Langue at a French University.

I do not miss Michigan (this week).

It’s been rather nice here lately. Mid 60’s and sunny. I even took off my coat and lied down outside on the grass today during my break. I have missed the sun so much!  And the sun doesn’t even set until 8:30pm these days!

In contrast, my parents have like 5 inches of snow on the ground. In April.

I love that even though the most southern point of France is at the same latitude as Detroit, the weather is much less cold and extreme here than it is in Michigan. Thank you Atlantic Ocean for your warm currents. This frileuse appreciates it!

Needless to say, I’m feeling good this week.  I’m sure the weather, spring vacation, and the Dominican Republic all have something to do with it. But I’m also happy for the new English assistants who just received their acceptance e-mails. (Almost a month earlier than last year – way to go embassy!)  It reminds me of when I received my acceptance letter and was so excited all summer long before coming to France.

And my excruciatingly long, 12 hour Tuesdays are finally finished! I had a crappy schedule this semester, but the morning labs have finished already, so no more wasting time and nearly falling asleep between classes. One more day of work before spring vacation, and then afterwards, only three more days of work before I finish on April 27 and have all summer off (until mid-September!)  And it’s paid vacation, of course.