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Learning Other Languages

Say it in French Phrasebook and Swedish Listening Resources Now Available

My Say it in French phrasebook (Dover Publications) is now available through Amazon.com for $5.95! I have recently updated the Listening Resources podcast to include Swedish mp3s. Transcripts, English translations, and an RSS feed are also available. Check out the Swedish Listening Resources page for the first eight mp3s. (The mp3 player is not Flash-based […]
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Most Studied Languages in Europe, Australia and the US

Yesterday was the 10th anniversary of the European Day of Languages and Eurostat has provided statistics about the most studied languages in the 27 member states of the European Union plus Iceland, Norway, Croatia, Macedonia and Turkey (though stats for Portugal are missing). “In the EU27 in 2009, 82% of pupils at primary and lower […]
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Multicultural and Multilingual Australia

One of the many reasons why I love Australia: an official Multicultural Policy From the government’s Multicultural Policy released in February of this year: “Australia is a multicultural nation. In all, since 1945, seven million people have migrated to Australia. Today, one in four of Australia’s 22 million people were born overseas, 44 per cent […]
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Top 100 Language Lovers Blogs: Voting Starts Today at Lexiophiles

Lexiophiles’ Language Lovers 2011 competition is now open for voting. This year the four categories are: – Language Learning Blogs – Language Professionals Blogs – Language Facebook Pages – Language Twitterers Since I won 3rd place overall last year (in the Top 100 Language Blogs) and 2nd place in the Top 100 Language Learning Blogs, my blog was automatically […]
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Comparative Grammar of the French, Italian, Spanish and Portuguese Languages

My new favorite book. Published in 1868! 400 pages of comparative goodness. Verb conjugations (we really should bring back thou hadst and the T-V distinction in English!) There’s even vocabulary at the end, though the words are not grouped thematically like they are in The Loom of Language. I’ve also ordered A Comparative Practical Grammar […]
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