Sorry I’ve been neglecting you, blog.

France celebrated Daylight Savings Time this morning, so now I am back to being 6 hours apart from Michigan.

I checked my details on the CAF website yesterday, and I will be receiving 650 € for the months of November to February! No word yet if David and I will receive anything since we’re PACSed now. It makes no sense to me, but the CAF uses your income from the previous year to determine if/how much you receive for the current year. And apparently, David and I made too much money last year, so we’ll most likely get nothing… which is really annoying since I will have no income after April…

And I am having a problem getting a new Carte de Séjour. The Préfecture is claiming that even though I have a valid CDS travailleur temporaire, I must still return to the US and get a long-stay visa in order to get the CDS visiteur that I am entitled to after being PACSed. I am supposed to be able to just do a “changement de statut” and change it from travailleur temporaire to visiteur without needing a new visa. I have no idea why the Préfecture is telling me that or what I’m supposed to do now. But I have to do something quick because my current CDS expires on May 7.

I’m really anxious to know if I can renew my assistantship for next year. I have no idea what to do if I don’t have that job again. I won’t be eligible for the CDS vie privée et familiale (that gives me the right to work in France) until February 2008 and David can’t afford to support the both of us since we both have student loans to pay off. And if CAF won’t help us just because we’re PACSed now… I don’t know how we’ll manage.

I used to love the EU and the idea of a European community, but I’m really starting to hate it because it’s so discriminatory to non-EU citizens. My EU friends can stay in France as long as they’d like and find a job easily. They don’t have to go through the hassle of getting a CDS or being forbidden from staying and/or working in France. Plus they can get unemployment benefits, which I cannot. And yet they are just as un-French as I am.

En fait, I used to love France and dreamed about living here for years. But now I see there are so many problems that we have to face (for the French and non-French citizens…) Unemployment is high; salaries are low. The low cost of health insurance and university education is nice, as well as low-income housing benefits… but only if you qualify based on their ridiculous rules. Sarko’s new laws are making it so hard for non-EU citizens to stay in France; and I honestly don’t want to stay here forever anymore.

David and I are still serious about immigrating to Quebec next year. Montreal, I miss you so.

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  • Samantha

    Welcome to REAL life in France as a foreigner, ie. not study-abroad/assistant life where stuff is easy! It can be a rude adjustment, but you’ll get there in in the end! *S*

  • Samantha

    Welcome to REAL life in France as a foreigner, ie. not study-abroad/assistant life where stuff is easy! It can be a rude adjustment, but you’ll get there in in the end! *S*

  • Jennie

    Yeah, it’s going to be a rude awakening without that nice monthly stipend in my account. I’ll suffer through it though. Somehow.

    I told David he has to get me a cat so I won’t be so alone in the summer.

  • Jennie

    Yeah, it’s going to be a rude awakening without that nice monthly stipend in my account. I’ll suffer through it though. Somehow.I told David he has to get me a cat so I won’t be so alone in the summer.

  • Bradley

    Quebec me manque.

    Tu me manques aussi.

  • Bradley

    Quebec me manque.Tu me manques aussi.

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Why is Jennie no longer in France?

I created this blog in September 2006 when I moved to France from Michigan to teach English. Many of the earlier posts are about my personal life in France, dealing with culture shock, traveling in Europe and becoming fluent in French. In January 2010, I started focusing more on teaching and learning languages in general. In July 2011, I relocated to Australia to start my PhD in Applied Linguistics. Although I am no longer living in France, my research is on foreign language pedagogy and I teach French at the university so these themes appear most often on the blog. I also continue to post about traveling (though now my trips are usually in Australia) and being an American abroad.

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