Ophtalmologiste

I’ve been to the doctor three times already in France (four if you count the visite medicale required for the carte de séjour), but today was my first appointment at an eye doctor. Not only did I finally learn the difference between an ophthalmologist and an optician – I always just say eye doctor in English – I also managed to not forget the alphabet or numbers. I tend to forget the simplest things in French when I get nervous.

My appointment was with a nice young man at the Clinique Générale (which is like a maze when you aren’t sure where you should go), and the appointment took less than 20 minutes. First I looked at a road with a hot-air balloon at the end, and then it was on to the boring letters and numbers. Bright light so he could inspect my retinas and that was it. No annoying puff of air or that bizarre stain to dilate your pupils. I handed over my Carte Vitale, paid 48 € and got two ordonnances, for new glasses and new contacts.

Now I need to go to an optician to choose my frames and turn in my prescriptions. Ophtalmologistes (what I used to call eye doctors) and opticiens are not in the same office in France. The person who checks your eyes and the person who makes your glasses are two different people and professions. I never really paid attention to that before in the US. Actually, I don’t know if I ever even met my optician there…

P.S. Net is clear, and flou is blurry.

Oh la France.

Getting a job in France is very hard, even for the French. Jobs here are based on your diplomas or degrees, not experience, which forces young people to go to university for years in order to obtain jobs that 16 year-olds do in the US. Every job is a contract; CDI if it’s long-term (no […]

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dimanche le 17 juin

Bonne Fête des Pères ! Father’s Day is the same day in the US and France – the third Sunday in June. Which is slightly less complicated than Mother’s Day, which is the second Sunday in May in the US and the last Sunday in May in France – unless that last Sunday is also […]

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Freebox

Our internet/telephone/TV finally works! We have so many channels in so many languages. I should never be bored again.

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Je suis toujours là !

The new apartment is perfect for David and me. We still have to attach the douchette to the wall and hang some curtains, but we’re all moved in. Except the electric oven doesn’t work yet, the dishwasher is too far from the kitchen to be plugged in, we have yet to buy a microwave, and […]

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Wonders

I just visited the last remaining Wonder of the World (pyramids at Giza) and came upon this site yesterday: New Seven Wonders of the World You can vote for new Wonders out of 20 candidates, such as Taj Mahal, Chichen Itza, Great Wall of China, Acropolis, Stonehenge, Easter Island Statues, etc. Maybe I’m just old-fashioned, […]

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Le retour

I’m back in France, once again. I feel really tired even though Egypt was only an hour later than France, and I still have this weird stomachache that is not going away. I definitely think I’m done with travelling for a while. Wasting time in airports and on planes is not how I want to […]

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Greetings from Egypt

I’m in Cairo! It’s hot and there are a bazillion people everywhere. But I’m liking it. Even after an 11 hour wait in Milan and Alitalia losing my luggage (which I still haven’t got back.) It’s so chaotic and crowded, and the gap between rich and poor is ridiculously wide, but it’s still interesting and […]

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DAEFLE

David went to Lyon today to take an Alliance Française test. He’s hoping to get the DIPLOME D’APTITUDE A L’ENSEIGNEMENT DU FRANÇAIS LANGUE ETRANGERE (DAEFLE) so he can teach French in Canada. First, the candidate must pass a written exam to determine their command of French. We were thinking it would be a grammar test, […]

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In happier news…

Vancouver is the world’s best place to live, a survey by the Economist Intelligence Unit (EIU) has found. The EIU ranked 127 cities in terms of personal risk, infrastructure and the availability of goods and services. All the cities that fell into the top “liveability” bracket were based in Canada, Australia and Western Europe. Top […]

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Why is Jennie no longer in France?

I created this blog in September 2006 when I moved to France from Michigan to teach English. Many of the earlier posts are about my personal life in France, dealing with culture shock, traveling in Europe and becoming fluent in French. In July 2011, I relocated to Australia to start my PhD in Applied Linguistics. Although I am no longer living in France, my research is on foreign language pedagogy and I teach French at a university so these themes appear most often on the blog. I also continue to post about traveling and being an American abroad.

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