Listening to text messages / SMS / textos in France

Someone called our apartment this morning, but as it was a 01 number (i.e. Paris) that I didn’t recognize, I assumed it was a wrong number. But they kept calling back every 20 minutes. So I finally answered and heard this:

Vous avez reçu un SMS en provenance du 06 xx xx xx xx. Faites le 1 pour écouter….

WHAAAA? It’s possible to send text messages to a landline and listen to them?

The message was something like “Je suis ?? Je peux passer” read by a female computerized voice. I didn’t recognize the cell number either, and since almost no one has my landline number, I’m assuming it was a mistake.

But I’m wondering how effective this service is with the way people write text messages in French. I still have a hard time figuring out what people are trying to say half the time with all the alternate spellings and numbers replacing syllables!

So if you receive a call from 01 41 00 49 00, you have a new SMS. If you want to send an SMS to a landline, you need to use the original number (the ones that begin with 01 through 05) and not the number that your ISP gives you (09 for Free, etc.)

I’ve tried it with both of our cell phones so far, and Orange uses that 01 number for the caller ID, while SFR uses the actual cell phone number. I always wondered what would happen if I accidentally sent an SMS to a landline, and now I know that it doesn’t just get lost in cyberspace.

Anybody know if this type of service is available in the US too?

Where did all of this stuff come from??

Packing sucks. I still don’t know what day we’re moving, but I’m already packing some things that we won’t be using in the next few weeks. We have so much stuff! And I don’t know where it all came from! We’ve only been in this apartment for two years, but I wasn’t even in France […]

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How much does your best friend love you?

Mine sent me this, and it was a total surprise because he had never sent me anything before: Bradley, I miss you so much. But see you (and the unicorns!) in July!!!

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Bonne Fête du Travail !

Or Labor Day. Or May Day. Or Day of Protest. Or Lily-of-the-Valley Day. Or go to the movies day. Or yet another excuse for a long weekend day.

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Do As the French Do (but without the mistakes)

Which city was the capital of Roman and Christian Gaul? a. Nice   b. Arles   c. Marseille The correct answer is, of course, LYON. But Ross Steele’s When in France, Do as the French Do claims the answer is c. Marseille, even though page 92 clearly states “Lyon, where the Rhône and Saône rivers meet, was […]

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I finished my last class of the semester on Monday and I am now on vacation. Technically I don’t work my regular contract hours again until mid-September when the next school year begins. Though I am working extra hours in June at a conference and proctoring the make-up exams for the other English lectrice who […]

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Convenience comes to France in the form of Auchan Drive

I often complain about the lack of convenience in France because I really miss services designed to make your life easier, which seem to be available everywhere in the US (except public transportation…)  We have drive-thru windows not only at fast food places, but also at banks and pharmacies. Some stores stay open 24 hours […]

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The Punta Cana Post

The Dominican Republic was lovely. We had sun everyday except for the wedding when it rained a little. But as they say in Spanish boda lluviosa, boda dichosa – and in French as well, mariage pluvieux, mariage heureux – a rainy wedding is a happy wedding. So first, let me say ¡Felicidades! and Félicitations ! […]

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Why is Jennie no longer in France?

I created this blog in September 2006 when I moved to France from Michigan to teach English. Many of the earlier posts are about my personal life in France, dealing with culture shock, traveling in Europe and becoming fluent in French. In July 2011, I relocated to Australia to start my PhD in Applied Linguistics. Although I am no longer living in France, my research is on foreign language pedagogy and I teach French at a university so these themes appear most often on the blog. I also continue to post about traveling and being an American abroad.

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