Dual Citizenship

I just wanted to say Congratulations and Félicitations !! to two ladies who have gained dual citizenship. I am extremely happy and excited for them.  They worked very hard for this and survived the year-long application process. They give me hope that I’ll be able to become a dual citizen one day too.

+ Erica is American, and now French, as of April 21st.

+ Zhu is French, and will be Canadian on July 3rd.

To become a French citizen, you have to wait two years if you are working toward or have completed a graduate degree at a French university; four years if you are married to a French citizen and lived in France for all four years (otherwise, it is five years if you do not live in France); or five years if you have lived and worked in France continuously (sometimes a CDI is required though.)

You can also apply for the 10 year carte de résident (instead of the 1 year carte de séjour year after year…) if you have been married to a French citizen for three years or if you’ve lived in France continuously for three years, but you have to prove your “worthiness” to the préfecture and have the mayor of your town approve it. And of course, some préfectures require five years and a minimum salary of something like 11,000 € for each year spent in France. (Don’t you just love how something as important as your legal status in France is completely random depending on where you live?

I haven’t asked my préfecture yet what their requirements are for the carte de résident. I have lived in France since September 2006, but until March 2008, I was on a travailleur temporaire card, so those don’t really count for anything. Maybe in March 2011 I can apply for it if I can convince them that there should be no legal difference between marriage and PACS. In any case, I’m hoping to apply for French citizenship once I’m a few years into my PhD, which I will hopefully start in 2010.

Zhu is doing a series of posts on immigrating to Canada, so check out her blog if you’re interested.

Homesick again

Today is my brother’s wedding reception in Michigan. I went to the wedding in April in the Dominican Republic, and since I’m already going home in July for my sister’s wedding, I couldn’t really afford to go home for this reception too. Now I’m realizing that I probably should have just gone home for 6 […]

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How French bureaucracy will drive you insane

My préfecture allows applying for a new carte grise by mail, so I thought, Great! No waiting in line! I can just send everything by mail and be done with it. Oh, but I was wrong. I mailed my old carte grise, a copy of my CDS, a copy of the June quittance de loyer, […]

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Bring on Les Soldes !

The summer sales period in France begins this Wednesday, June 24 at 8 AM and lasts until midnight on July 28. Thanks to the magic of the interwebs, I will be on my computer ordering things for the apartment instead of dealing with crowds at stores. Thank goodness for LaRedoute and 3Suisses ! These huge […]

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New Long-Stay Visa & First Residence Permit Procedures for France

As of June 1st, 2009, holders of long-stay visas no longer have to obtain a carte de séjour after arrival in France or the DOM-TOMS* for students, assistants, lecteurs/lectrices, visitors, salaried workers, temporary workers, and spouses of French nationals (but not other EU nationals – then you don’t need a visa at all). The visa […]

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Changement de Domicile

I’ve spent the past 5 days trying to figure out how/when/where to change my address for all the official things. I’m still not finished. There is a free site that allows you to change your address for a lot of organizations, such as CAF, Pôle emploi, CPAM, EDF, Centre des Impôts, etc.  You can also do réexpédition […]

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Carte de Séjour Vie Privée et Familiale: Chambéry Version

Even though I just renewed my CDS at the end of March in Annecy, since we moved to a new département, I had to apply for a whole new card instead of simply changing my address on it. The last time I moved, I stayed within the same département, so they just put a sticker […]

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Moving was the easy part.

Settling in is the hard part. I am very anxious to just feel at home in the new place, but it’s difficult without furniture in certain rooms. But because it’s Sunday, almost all stores are closed and I can’t accomplish much. I’m going crazy with the lack of, well, everything in the kitchen because it […]

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The Beauty of Istanbul

Aya Sofya (Hagia Sophia) Blue Mosque Basilica Cistern Istiklal Caddesi when it’s not busy Shopping on Istiklal Grand Bazaar Spice Market New Mosque across the Bosphorous Galata Tower Random adorable cat # 2,547 French Quarter Çay (Tea) Hope to see you again someday, Turkey!

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Istanbul in one word: AMAZING

Istanbul was the most beautiful, interesting, amazing place I have ever been. I loved the mixture of old and new and east and west. It is very European in some ways, and not so European in other ways. Trying to figure out Turkish was slightly exhausting as it’s not an Indo-European language, but now I […]

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Why is Jennie no longer in France?

I created this blog in September 2006 when I moved to France from Michigan to teach English. Many of the earlier posts are about my personal life in France, dealing with culture shock, traveling in Europe and becoming fluent in French. In January 2010, I started focusing more on teaching and learning languages in general. In July 2011, I relocated to Australia to start my PhD in Applied Linguistics. Although I am no longer living in France, my research is on foreign language pedagogy and I teach French at the university so these themes appear most often on the blog. I also continue to post about traveling (though now my trips are usually in Australia) and being an American abroad.

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