France is Distorting my Childhood Memories

I don’t watch much TV in France, and I certainly don’t like to watch American shows dubbed in French, but since Michelle and I were both sick last week we often returned to the hotel early and watched The A-Team. In French it’s called L’Agence Tous Risques and it’s like a completely different show because the theme song that every child of the 80’s instantly recognizes is missing.

In case you need to be reminded of the awesomeness of the original theme song, here it is:

And here is the French version, which is not awesome:

Why, France, why??

Plus the names of the characters are different: Face became Futé, B.A. changed to Barracuda, and Murdock was called Looping. At least they left Hannibal alone (though without the initial /h/ sound, of course).

The theme song for The Dukes of Hazzard (the not at all stupidly named Shérif, fais-moi peur ! in French) is also completely different. No love for Waylon Jennings and The Good Ol’ Boys. Instead we get this:

I do have to admit that the French intro for Dallas is slightly better than the instrumental American one. It’s kind of catchy and it is actually the most famous TV theme song in France:

You can find lyrics and other theme songs at Génériques TV. Sometimes they have both the original and French versions and other times it’s just the French one, but of course, you need to know the French translation of names of the shows too. You can always just use Wikipedia and “Languages” in the left column to figure them out.

I am not a fan of dubbing at all and I wish the translations of titles were more direct (The Avengers is Chapeau Melon et Bottes de Cuir! ::sigh::), but I don’t understand why new theme songs are written in French, especially when the original version has no English lyrics anyway. Why can’t they just stick to the original as closely as possible? As with dubbing, it diminishes the authenticity of the work. Subtitles cannot convey this entirely either since they are merely translations, but it’s better than adding something new as if the original writers had created it.

And now the L’Agence Tous Risques song keeps getting stuck in my head and I instantly think Barracuda instead of B.A. when I picture Mr. T. I still understand pop culture references to classic American shows and movies, but I can’t make them anymore because the French names or titles come out of my mouth first so Americans have no idea what I’m talking about. Thanks France for distorting my memories of the 80’s!

It’s good to be home in France, but I miss Germany. And what is happening to Belgium???

I returned home from my 2 week trip yesterday with a cold and over 800 photos. Getting back into a routine is a little hard because I’m so exhausted, but I have managed to upload Dutch, German and French realia as well as several new photo albums. We went to Brussels, Bruges, Amsterdam, Cologne, Düsseldorf, […]

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Traveling through Germanic Languages and History

I’ve been traveling for the past week through Brussels, Amsterdam, Cologne and Munich. I have been trying to listen to as much Dutch and German as possible and collect all sorts of realia to learn more vocabulary. Of course I’ve also been going to educational places like Mini Europe, which I highly recommend for learning […]

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Jennie en France #2 in Top Language Learning Blogs 2010!

Bab.la announced the winners of the Top 100 Language Blogs 2010 today and I was very surprised to see that Jennie en France was #2 in the Language Learning category and #3 in the overall top 100 blogs! Thank you to everyone who voted and a special thank you to Benny at fluentin3months.com (who ranked […]

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Multilingual Goodness of the Eurovision Song Contest

The Eurovision Song Contest is going on this week in Oslo and even though I’m not watching it, I am using the unofficial website to learn languages through song lyrics. It is called the Diggiloo Thrush and it includes the lyrics and translations into English of almost all of the songs ever performed for the […]

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Common Slang Verbs in Informal Spoken French: New Video

The 4th video in the informal French series: slang verbs with their standard/written counterparts, with sample sentences to illustrate their use. Don’t forget! Voting ends today at 11:59 PM French time / 5:59 PM Eastern Standard Time!

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Using Realia Resources in Language Teaching & Learning

Realia is everyday, authentic objects, such as photographs, menus, brochures, receipts, maps, movies, television shows, commercials, etc. that are used to teach and learn languages. Some researchers include any items that can be used to prompt conversations or role-play, such as telephones, but those are generally meant to be employed in the classroom with other […]

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København, Danmark

Denmark was lovely. Even with the awful weather – I should have brought my winter coat and gloves! – everything just was so pleasant. The people were nice, the food was good, and the museums were interesting. My pictures don’t do Copenhagen justice because of the dark, cloudy sky but the city is so beautiful […]

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Copenhagen for the Weekend

I am leaving once again. This time I’m off to Copenhagen to meet up with one of my oldest friends from Michigan. The weather forecast looks gloomy but I’m definitely looking forward to seeing Jessica (she just got her PhD, so it’s Dr. Jessica now!) and being in Scandinavia for the first time. We might […]

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Please vote for Jennie in France in the Top 100 Language Learning Blogs 2010

Jennie in France has been nominated for the Top 100 Language Learning Blogs 2010 at Lexiophiles. Voting starts today and ends May 24, with winners announced on May 28. Click below to vote in the Language Learning category: There are also three other categories for Language Teaching, Language Technology, and Language Professionals. You can vote […]

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Why is Jennie no longer in France?

I created this blog in September 2006 when I moved to France from Michigan to teach English. Many of the earlier posts are about my personal life in France, dealing with culture shock, traveling in Europe and becoming fluent in French. In July 2011, I relocated to Australia to start my PhD in Applied Linguistics. Although I am no longer living in France, my research is on foreign language pedagogy and I teach French at a university so these themes appear most often on the blog. I also continue to post about traveling and being an American abroad.

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