Why I Hate Low-Cost Airlines (Notably Easyjet)

We had a great time in Italy until we tried to get back to France. Our flight was scheduled for 6:15pm on July 4th. It is now 3:42am July 5th and we are still in Venice. The flight was delayed later and later until finally at midnight, it was cancelled. There were storms here tonight, but every other flight was able to take off except ours. There were no announcements at all the entire time from Easyjet so we had no idea what was going on.

Then we find out all the Easyjet crew had left the airport and there was no one to help us. One hundred passengers abandoned at an airport that was closing. The police wanted us all to leave, but go where? All of the hotels are supposedly booked because of the festival, and there’s no public transportation after 1 am anyway.

So we’re still camping out at the security area, annoying the police who were supposed to go home hours ago. Luckily they haven’t kicked us outside yet.

Easyjet is supposed to pay for a hotel and give us food and water and telephone calls when a flight is cancelled. I’m sure they’ll find a reason to say it was beyond their control and it was an extraordinary circumstance (because storms never happen, right?) so our passenger rights don’t have to be respected. I am thoroughly disgusted at the way people are treated. I’ve seen too many children crying and old people suffering that I feel sick.

I know these things happen when dealing with flying and airports, but this is the first time I’ve ever experienced something this bad. People are missing work, have no access to medication they need, and no one will help us. It’s not like there was a volcanic eruption. It was a storm that passed in an hour and every other flight at this airport was able to take off.

Low-cost airlines might be a good deal, but I don’t know if I’ll ever be able to buy a ticket from them again knowing how they treat human beings.

Bassano del Grappa for the Weekend

I’m leaving France once again. We’re going here tomorrow: Bassano del Grappa is in the province of Vicenza in northern Italy. The parents of David’s maternal grandmother came from this city, and we are taking Mamie there so she can finally see where her parents lived. They moved to France in 1931 because they were […]

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Adventures at the French Post Office

Since I work from home at the moment, I haven’t been going out most days because 1. the weather has been crap until about 2 days ago and 2. I’m slightly anti-social, so living in Europe with its high population density stresses me out. And usually when I do go out to accomplish some mundane […]

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Bonne St. Jean!

Bonne St. Jean à tous mes amis québécois! If you don’t know what St. Jean is, read about it here.

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Non-French French and Why Am I Just Now Learning This?

I studied French for 3 years in high school and another 3 years at university between 1997 and 2003. Then I took some time off from languages while I was doing my Master’s in Linguistics and ended up moving to France in late 2006. So I guess you could say that I’ve been learning French […]

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Traveling in Western Europe on 100€ a Day

Traveling throughout Europe can actually be quite cheap if you do your research and reserve/buy certain things in advance. Here’s a rundown of the costs for my two week trip. We spent 3 nights in Brussels, 2 in Amsterdam, 2 in Köln, 3 in Munich and 4 in Strasbourg. I paid for one hotel and […]

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France is Distorting my Childhood Memories

I don’t watch much TV in France, and I certainly don’t like to watch American shows dubbed in French, but since Michelle and I were both sick last week we often returned to the hotel early and watched The A-Team. In French it’s called L’Agence Tous Risques and it’s like a completely different show because […]

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It’s good to be home in France, but I miss Germany. And what is happening to Belgium???

I returned home from my 2 week trip yesterday with a cold and over 800 photos. Getting back into a routine is a little hard because I’m so exhausted, but I have managed to upload Dutch, German and French realia as well as several new photo albums. We went to Brussels, Bruges, Amsterdam, Cologne, Düsseldorf, […]

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Traveling through Germanic Languages and History

I’ve been traveling for the past week through Brussels, Amsterdam, Cologne and Munich. I have been trying to listen to as much Dutch and German as possible and collect all sorts of realia to learn more vocabulary. Of course I’ve also been going to educational places like Mini Europe, which I highly recommend for learning […]

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Jennie en France #2 in Top Language Learning Blogs 2010!

Bab.la announced the winners of the Top 100 Language Blogs 2010 today and I was very surprised to see that Jennie en France was #2 in the Language Learning category and #3 in the overall top 100 blogs! Thank you to everyone who voted and a special thank you to Benny at fluentin3months.com (who ranked […]

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Why is Jennie no longer in France?

I created this blog in September 2006 when I moved to France from Michigan to teach English. Many of the earlier posts are about my personal life in France, dealing with culture shock, traveling in Europe and becoming fluent in French. In January 2010, I started focusing more on teaching and learning languages in general. In July 2011, I relocated to Australia to start my PhD in Applied Linguistics. Although I am no longer living in France, my research is on foreign language pedagogy and I teach French at the university so these themes appear most often on the blog. I also continue to post about traveling (though now my trips are usually in Australia) and being an American abroad.

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