Olympics Vocabulary in French

I’ve never been a big fan of the Olympics or of watching sports on TV, but I have caught a few events on French TV this week. If nothing else, it helps with learning sports vocabulary in French. [And why did I never notice before that the French use Pékin whereas we use Beijing? ]

I’m teaching Olympic vocabulary in English to my private student tonight, so I was searching for websites to help with lesson planning and I found some language resources on the Australian Olympics Committee’s site: Olympic Resource for Languages

In the International Year of Languages, the Modern Languages Teachers’ Association of Victoria (MLTAV) has developed the Olympic Resource for Languages.

The resource introduces students to the Olympics, uncovering the Olympic symbols whilst preparing them for a school-based Olympic celebration held in the language they are learning. The celebrations will take place on Olympic Day – Friday 20 June 2008.

The resource includes five LOTE (Languages Other Then English) lessons available in nine languages: Arabic, Chinese, Croatian, French, German, Indonesian, Italian, Japanese and Spanish.

Even though they’re designed for teachers of those languages to use in their classes, you can still learn some Olympic vocabulary from them. And here’s another site with French Olympics vocabulary: French Phrases: Talking about the Olympic Games in French

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  • http://toutesdirectionspourlafrance.blogspot.com/ L

    I know the name changed in English from Pekin to Beijing. When I was a kid we had some old atlases (or my school did) and I remember seeing Pekin listed. A professor of Chinese at my college said that the ‘j’ in Beijing should be hard, and that he hated how news casters mistakenly pronounced it as a soft ‘j’ all the time. If you say it correctly, Beijing doesn’t sound that much different from Pekin. Now, as to when the names changed officially in English, I don’t now. Like I don’t know when Bombay India became Mumbai.

    Ls last blog post..C’est officiel

  • http://toutesdirectionspourlafrance.blogspot.com L

    I know the name changed in English from Pekin to Beijing. When I was a kid we had some old atlases (or my school did) and I remember seeing Pekin listed. A professor of Chinese at my college said that the ‘j’ in Beijing should be hard, and that he hated how news casters mistakenly pronounced it as a soft ‘j’ all the time. If you say it correctly, Beijing doesn’t sound that much different from Pekin. Now, as to when the names changed officially in English, I don’t now. Like I don’t know when Bombay India became Mumbai.

    Ls last blog post..C’est officiel

  • Emmy

    haha, unlike you Jennie, i’ve been watching a VERY unhealthy amount of the Olympics and I hadn’t noticed either that they use Pékin instead of Beijing. Now, that’s shameful….As I write this I’ve heard them say it at least 4 times…I have zero observation skills evidently!

  • http://Emmygration Emmy

    haha, unlike you Jennie, i’ve been watching a VERY unhealthy amount of the Olympics and I hadn’t noticed either that they use Pékin instead of Beijing. Now, that’s shameful….As I write this I’ve heard them say it at least 4 times…I have zero observation skills evidently!

  • http://french-state-of-mind.blogspot.com/ Monique

    Well we used to call it Peking way back in the day. That’s why if you ever order Chinese food, we have a dish called “Peking Duck.”

    Crazy!

    Moniques last blog post..iExpensive.

  • http://french-state-of-mind.blogspot.com Monique

    Well we used to call it Peking way back in the day. That’s why if you ever order Chinese food, we have a dish called “Peking Duck.”

    Crazy!

    Moniques last blog post..iExpensive.

  • http://www.ielanguages.com Jennie Wagner

    Yeah, I remember seeing Peking in old atlases too… and I have no idea when English officially changed to Beijing. I guess that’s why my mind went straight from Pékin to Peking to Beijing when I saw it in French. I never stopped to realize they were using the “old” word we used to use in English.

  • http://www.ielanguages.com Jennie

    Yeah, I remember seeing Peking in old atlases too… and I have no idea when English officially changed to Beijing. I guess that’s why my mind went straight from Pékin to Peking to Beijing when I saw it in French. I never stopped to realize they were using the “old” word we used to use in English.

  • http://davidsswamp.blogspot.com/ David

    If I’m not wrong, the official name has been changed to Beijing in France too. But it never really caught in the population’s everyday language… (I have doubts about this info though)

    Davids last blog post..Here Comes Anpanman!

  • http://davidsswamp.blogspot.com David

    If I’m not wrong, the official name has been changed to Beijing in France too. But it never really caught in the population’s everyday language… (I have doubts about this info though)

    Davids last blog post..Here Comes Anpanman!

  • http://camillesourget.com/ antiquarian books

    Great site. Thanks… :)

  • http://camillesourget.com antiquarian books

    Great site. Thanks… :)

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