In happier news…

Vancouver is the world’s best place to live, a survey by the Economist Intelligence Unit (EIU) has found. The EIU ranked 127 cities in terms of personal risk, infrastructure and the availability of goods and services. All the cities that fell into the top “liveability” bracket were based in Canada, Australia and Western Europe.

Top Ten Cities
1. Vancouver (Canada)
2. Melbourne (Australia)
3. Vienna (Austria)
4. Geneva (Switzerland)
5. Perth (Australia)
6. Adelaide (Australia)
7. Sydney (Australia)
8. Zurich (Switzerland)
9. Toronto (Canada)
10. Calgary (Canada)

I’ve only been to 3, 4, and 9 so far. I was supposed to move to 5 this year. If David and I don’t end up in Montreal, we might end up in 1. I will definitely go to all of the Australian ones someday…

Do you agree with 2, Rochelle? :)

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  • Mlle Smith

    I met a girl from Canada a couple of years ago and she said there was a city in Canada that had springtime, year-round. Wasn’t it Vancouver? If I remember correctly, it was Vancouver, but I’m not sure. She said it’s very expensive to live there as a result…

  • Mlle Smith

    I met a girl from Canada a couple of years ago and she said there was a city in Canada that had springtime, year-round. Wasn’t it Vancouver? If I remember correctly, it was Vancouver, but I’m not sure.

    She said it’s very expensive to live there as a result…

  • DestinationMetz

    Wow Melbourne got 2 that’s pretty darn good. I’m surprised they haven’t started spruiking about it already hehe! Well, I would say that in terms of goods and services being available, thats true. Where I would differ is public transport infrastructure. Melbourne is comprised of a small cbd and suburbs. Unfortunately the city is designed poorly in terms of public transport- basically to go somewhere in a car its quick but if you take a tram or a train you’re going to be spending a lot of time getting to your destination. Unlike the metro, our train tracks don’t intersect so you have to ride a line for a long time to get to a stop you want. Plus the public transport system was privatised to a French company who is getting fined millions of dollars per year for being so late all the time, plus they have made ticket prices REALLY high and give out a lot of heavy fines (150 dollars if you don’t have a valid ticket, even if a machine isn’t working they will claim otherwise). Personal risk…its relatively safe, but personally I’d feel safer walking the streets at night in Paris thats for sure. There seems to be a lot of sexual assault, but due to our great gun control laws hardly any deaths by shooting, although of course, people do use knives. I think in 10 years it will be a really super hip city to be actually so stay tuned. Right now though it’s not worth visiting..Christophe was mightily unimpressed to be honest although he did like a few things about it of course :)

  • DestinationMetz

    Wow Melbourne got 2 that’s pretty darn good. I’m surprised they haven’t started spruiking about it already hehe!

    Well, I would say that in terms of goods and services being available, thats true. Where I would differ is public transport infrastructure. Melbourne is comprised of a small cbd and suburbs. Unfortunately the city is designed poorly in terms of public transport- basically to go somewhere in a car its quick but if you take a tram or a train you’re going to be spending a lot of time getting to your destination. Unlike the metro, our train tracks don’t intersect so you have to ride a line for a long time to get to a stop you want. Plus the public transport system was privatised to a French company who is getting fined millions of dollars per year for being so late all the time, plus they have made ticket prices REALLY high and give out a lot of heavy fines (150 dollars if you don’t have a valid ticket, even if a machine isn’t working they will claim otherwise).

    Personal risk…its relatively safe, but personally I’d feel safer walking the streets at night in Paris thats for sure. There seems to be a lot of sexual assault, but due to our great gun control laws hardly any deaths by shooting, although of course, people do use knives.

    I think in 10 years it will be a really super hip city to be actually so stay tuned. Right now though it’s not worth visiting..Christophe was mightily unimpressed to be honest although he did like a few things about it of course :)

  • Linda

    All of the cities are in Australia or Canada. This surprises me. I’ve been to many of the cities and like them but I do wonder how this list came to be. Was it put together by an English group? Interesting anyway.

  • Linda

    All of the cities are in Australia or Canada. This surprises me. I’ve been to many of the cities and like them but I do wonder how this list came to be. Was it put together by an English group? Interesting anyway.

  • Roman Mommy

    I cannot imagine living in Canada again. Too bland. Plus you have to deal with looking at all the really ugly 1960s architecture.

  • Roman Mommy

    I cannot imagine living in Canada again. Too bland. Plus you have to deal with looking at all the really ugly 1960s architecture.

Why is Jennie no longer in France?

I created this blog in September 2006 when I moved to France from Michigan to teach English. Many of the earlier posts are about my personal life in France, dealing with culture shock, traveling in Europe and becoming fluent in French. In July 2011, I relocated to Australia to start my PhD in Applied Linguistics. Although I am no longer living in France, my research is on foreign language pedagogy and I teach French at a university so these themes appear most often on the blog. I also continue to post about traveling and being an American abroad.

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