French Listening Resources: Weekly Updates to Podcast

I’ve just uploaded the latest mp3 to the French Listening Resources podcast, so it will be available for download soon through iTunes or immediately through the site. I’m going to try to update every weekend and also provide the transcript right away (in text format and as a new page so you can listen and read at the same time). Currently most of the mp3s have transcripts available, but I’m still working on a few of them. And eventually I will add the translation into English and some notes on the vocabulary.  Any thoughts on what would be helpful for getting the most out of these listening resources? Interactive exercises? Explanations of vocabulary choice or grammar usage? Any requests on topics?

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  • Matt

    Personally, the most useful resources are sentences bundles, containing:

    1) a native (not textbook) French sentence
    2) MP3 of a native speaking that sentence
    3) a rough English translation (not necessarily literal, but just enough to get the jist of the sentence)

    Every single one of those can be turned into a digital flashcard for programs like Anki and Supermemo (the “question” is the audio and French text, the “answer” is the rough English translation). As a beginner, I never read French text that doesn’t have accompanying audio, because without it I will butcher the pronunciation. Your site is has lots of sentences with audio (I use Audacity to chop up the MP3s into individual sentences), so thank you for the great content you’ve provided!

  • Matt

    Personally, the most useful resources are sentences bundles, containing:

    1) a native (not textbook) French sentence
    2) MP3 of a native speaking that sentence
    3) a rough English translation (not necessarily literal, but just enough to get the jist of the sentence)

    Every single one of those can be turned into a digital flashcard for programs like Anki and Supermemo (the “question” is the audio and French text, the “answer” is the rough English translation). As a beginner, I never read French text that doesn’t have accompanying audio, because without it I will butcher the pronunciation. Your site is has lots of sentences with audio (I use Audacity to chop up the MP3s into individual sentences), so thank you for the great content you’ve provided!

  • http://www.ielanguages.com Jennie Wagner

    @Matt: I agree, and I am working on finishing the transcripts and adding the English translations.

  • http://www.ielanguages.com Jennie

    @Matt: I agree, and I am working on finishing the transcripts and adding the English translations.

Why is Jennie no longer in France?

I created this blog in September 2006 when I moved to France from Michigan to teach English. Many of the earlier posts are about my personal life in France, dealing with culture shock, traveling in Europe and becoming fluent in French. In July 2011, I relocated to Australia to start my PhD in Applied Linguistics. Although I am no longer living in France, my research is on foreign language pedagogy and I teach French at a university so these themes appear most often on the blog. I also continue to post about traveling and being an American abroad.

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