Free Peace Corps Language Learning Materials: Over 100 Languages Available

If you love free public domain language learning resources as much as I do, then check out the Peace Corps Language Courses Archive. Live Lingua has a large collection of Peace Corps manuals teaching languages ranging from Acholi to Zarma (over 100 languages are available!) and some also include audio resources in addition to the language manuals. If you have other PC manuals to share, please let Live Lingua know and they will add them to their site.

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The Peace Corps does have their own Digital Library of Technical and Training Manuals if you are also interested in learning more about the work that PC Volunteers do. Although this library doesn’t seem to offer language courses, some of the manuals are written in French and Spanish so they can still be used as language learning resources.

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  • http://blog.fluenthistorian.com/ Natalie

    I will definitely be taking a look at these. I for one am dying to know the difference between Russian (General), Russian (Kazakhstan), and Russian (Kyrgyz). To my knowledge, there is no difference, which is why I’m so curious…

  • Ray Blakney

    Hi Natalie,
    I am the one who made and maintains the PC language archive. The reason why the languages are separated into these categories is because each material was made by the the Peace Corps offices in the respective countries. So the Kazakhstan Russian was made by PC Kazakhstan, the Russian (Kyrgyz) was made by the PC Kyrgyz. I did not combine them for this reason, and also because I don’t speak Russian, and there may differences (like those between British and U.S. English, or Mexican and Spain Spanish) that I am not aware. I erred on the side of caution. I hope you enjoy the free resources. Thanks Jennie for sharing!

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Why is Jennie no longer in France?

I created this blog in September 2006 when I moved to France from Michigan to teach English. Many of the earlier posts are about my personal life in France, dealing with culture shock, traveling in Europe and becoming fluent in French. In January 2010, I started focusing more on teaching and learning languages in general. In July 2011, I relocated to Australia to start my PhD in Applied Linguistics. Although I am no longer living in France, my research is on foreign language pedagogy and I teach French at the university so these themes appear most often on the blog. I also continue to post about traveling (though now my trips are usually in Australia) and being an American abroad.

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