Authentic French with Commercials and Films

Friday was my 30th birthday and as my birthday gift to all of you, I give you even more authentic French listening resources and exercises!  Luckily we have a great language lab at my university so I have been able to create some listening exercises for my students to try out, and of course  I want to share them with other educators and learners. So as a sister site to the original French Listening Resources – where you will find authentic and spontaneous mp3s and videos of French spoken in France – I have created a new page on ielanguages.com for learning authentic French with online videos and transcripts.

Authentic French with Commercials and Films

There are watch & read resources and some gap-fill exercises available for commercials, film trailers and the mini-série Bref. I also have a few transcripts of short scenes from films, but the clips are not available online so you’ll have to use the DVDs. The resources include Belgian, Canadian, and northern France (Picard / ch’ti) accents in addition to the standard French of France accent.

As of right now, the resources are: commercials for McDonald’s, Orangina, Nutella, and the film trailers for Rien à Déclarer and French Immersion as well as one episode of Bref. The DVD scene transcripts are available for L’auberge espagnole, Bienvenue chez les ch’tis, Prête-moi ta main, and Bon Cop Bad Cop. (I will add the time codes soon.)

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  • http://www.native-translator.co.uk/ Shamy

    It’s great to see that you’ve uploaded some good MP3 in your website. I agree it’s really helpful to listen the language while reading the same. It’s very important for any to know about the perfect pronunciation! 

  • http://howlearnspanish.com/ Andrew

    Oh that’s very cool, and I love that you’re providing a transcription of the actual French instead of a translation, those are actually much more useful than a translation, contrary to what a lot of people think when they first start looking into doing that (using movies and such to learn a foreign language)–those English subtitles actually won’t help you that much.

    Right now my favorite method of learning languages is movies with subtitles in the language that they’re speaking.

    Cheers,
    Andrew

  • http://kubuk.pl/ Karol Anglik

    Are there any subtitles for these movies?

  • http://dlugiezycie.pl/ Cris

    I haven’t seen any subtitles.

  • http://twojecbradio.pl/ CB radio

    I found it on opensubtitles !

Why is Jennie no longer in France?

I created this blog in September 2006 when I moved to France from Michigan to teach English. Many of the earlier posts are about my personal life in France, dealing with culture shock, traveling in Europe and becoming fluent in French. In July 2011, I relocated to Australia to start my PhD in Applied Linguistics. Although I am no longer living in France, my research is on foreign language pedagogy and I teach French at a university so these themes appear most often on the blog. I also continue to post about traveling and being an American abroad.

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