Appart

Finding an apartment is ridiculously hard in France. David and I have been searching for a few months now and everything is either too expensive, too small or too far away from public transportation. He only has a CDD (short-term work contract) and I’m unemployed. We were approved for Loca-Pass, but some landlords won’t accept it because they prefer a human co-signer (preferably a family member) instead of a business. Most apartments are rented through agencies instead of directly through the landlords, and they charge a few hundred euros for their “services.” We have a few friends who want to leave their apartments, but the problem is that they need to find new apartments too before they can move.

France has a problem with housing (not just affordable housing, but housing in general). I heard a few months ago on the news that there is a shortage of one million housing units. This does not mean that one million people are looking for housing. This means that there is no housing for one million families or couples or anyone else who could live together in an apartment or house.

The average rent for a one-bedroom apartment where I live runs more than 650 € ($873) a month, with no or few utilities included. I have no idea how single people survive here. That’s about the same price as my friend’s one-bedroom apartment in LA. In comparison, my one-bedroom apartment in Michigan was only $500 a month (372 €).

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...
0saves
If you enjoyed this post, please consider leaving a comment or subscribing to the RSS feed.
  • DestinationMetz

    Best of luck. Something will turn up, think positive. xx

  • DestinationMetz

    Best of luck. Something will turn up, think positive. xx

  • The Franco Fille

    I hear you. I’m staying in Europe this summer and the prices are ridiculous! Good luck!

  • The Franco Fille

    I hear you. I’m staying in Europe this summer and the prices are ridiculous! Good luck!

  • Felipe Alonso

    Hello Jennie!! I’m so pleased to have the chance to write you, directly, and I want to thank you from the bottom of my heart for having this site for such a long time, and it’s free!! I have seen through these years the changes your webpage has experienced, and how it has grown. Maybe you’re not aware of it, but let me tell you that I have learnt a lot by reading your tutorials, and the tutorials that others have given to you, and I’m sure that many people have learnt a lot, as well. :) I hope you’re very fine and if you want to practise your Spanish, just take a look at mi site. ;) ¡Chao y un abrazo desde Chile!

  • Felipe Alonso

    Hello Jennie!! I’m so pleased to have the chance to write you, directly, and I want to thank you from the bottom of my heart for having this site for such a long time, and it’s free!!
    I have seen through these years the changes your webpage has experienced, and how it has grown.
    Maybe you’re not aware of it, but let me tell you that I have learnt a lot by reading your tutorials, and the tutorials that others have given to you, and I’m sure that many people have learnt a lot, as well. :)

    I hope you’re very fine and if you want to practise your Spanish, just take a look at mi site. ;)

    ¡Chao y un abrazo desde Chile!

Search this Site

Why is Jennie no longer in France?

I created this blog in September 2006 when I moved to France from Michigan to teach English. Many of the earlier posts are about my personal life in France, dealing with culture shock, traveling in Europe and becoming fluent in French. In January 2010, I started focusing more on teaching and learning languages in general. In July 2011, I relocated to Australia to start my PhD in Applied Linguistics. Although I am no longer living in France, my research is on foreign language pedagogy and I teach French at the university so these themes appear most often on the blog. I also continue to post about traveling (though now my trips are usually in Australia) and being an American abroad.

Stay Connected

Facebook

Buy My French Books

My Say it in French phrasebook and Great French Short Stories dual-language book (both published by Dover Publications) are available at Amazon.com.

The 2nd edition of French Language Tutorial is now available as a PDF book. It has been updated with much more vocabulary, sample sentences, and cultural information, plus extended vocabulary lists, cross-referenced topics, and an alphabetical index.

Visit the Store to buy the PDF e-book for $14.95 or paperback book for $29.95.

Languages

     

Google Ads